Digital disruption, digital transformation…and you.

2019-02-18 8:02
https://dlaignite.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/animal-animal-photography-blurred-background-1207875.jpg

by Adam Gray | @AGSocialMedia | LinkedIn

It seems every time I open a report from one of the big consultancies they talk about digital transformation and how the marketplace in which they operate is “being disrupted” and how organisations need to “transform” to remain relevant to their customers.

In the UK we have established brands that are struggling to catch-up with their customer’s demands – John Lewis and Makes & Spencer spring to mind as prime examples (although there are many others) these are organisations that are trying so very hard to meet the expectations of clients that are used to next day delivery, interconnectedness of online and in-store experiences and free returns/replacements.

But when it comes to helping them find the answers an endless stream of platitudes churned out under the auspices of “insights” are all they get. Seldom more than opinion or stating the obvious.

Example (published this week):

In our survey of 6,672 business and IT executives, 45 percent report the pace of innovation in their organizations has “significantly accelerated” over the past three years due to emerging technologies and a further 49% have said it had “accelerated”

Well that surprises…erm…nobody. Just look around you. In the last 3 years alexa/homepod/Google home have all arrived. we all gave 4G and fast broadband. Pseudo AI is literally everywhere the list is endless.

So what value do reports like this provide (other than letting the buyer cover their ass if they choose to make a decision to do something)?. None (or at best very little). They don’t show the way forward, they don’t talk about what is possible, they barely even tell you things you don’t know or can’t guess.

Best practice?

In a recent video I watched (part of a TED promotional short) Patty McCord (former Chief Talent Officer at Netflix) said “Best practice isn’t usually best practice, it’s simply copying what everybody else does.” and these reports do that. They ask a load of people who are totally lost which way to go to get to a destination!

So what should YOU do?

Think about your customer. Where are they? How do they make decisions? What influences them? Then craft a method of engaging them so you seem like the obvious choice. Do not run a “journey mapping session” where a bunch of people who work for you (or are valued customers) “imagine” what other people might be thinking at certain points on their journey. Instead talk to people that are buying from your competitors and ask them why they didn’t buy from you.

It’s easy enough to find people that are talking about buying (and have bought) products…you simply search on social media and when people say “I’m thinking if buying the new XXXXX what do you think?” or “Check out what I’ve just bought, isn’t my XXXXX brilliant?” or whatever it might be you chat to them.

This is a good starting point as these are your customers (or prospects) talking about THEIR issues. Not bunch of suited geniuses who want to write yet another report.

You need to hear the truth though (the truth as seen by your customers) and not what your agency/consultancy wants you to hear. Then you need to be prepared to change yourself (or change the perception of you) to meet the buyer’s expectations.

A true story:

Some years ago, I went with my team to visit a massive telco to talk about their social media strategy. So prior to the meeting we conducted some social listening and when we arrived we showed the outputs and the client said “what words are people using about us.” 

As we all know many people have problems with the comms at home, at work, on the move… problems are commonplace, and so are complaints.

We said “we can produce a word cloud but we would not recommend it and you need to remember that you might not see what you want” the client was adamant.

We ran a word cloud and showed them. There were lots of words like – unhappy, disgusting, disappointed, poor, etc

But the biggest word. The word in the middle. The word in bold. The most used word was:

BASTARDS

My point is that the client was not ready (or willing) to accept this sort of candid feedback, so they did nothing.

You need to be and prepared to hear it and you need to take it on the chin because if this is what people are saying you have a problem that no amount of “digital transformation” or “insights” will fix!

People who read this article also read these:

https://www.social-experts.net/still-spending-money-on-people-that-will-never-buy-from-you/

https://www.social-experts.net/have-you-had-a-linkedin-cold-call/

https://www.social-experts.net/the-power-of-video-in-the-social-world/

 

AVANTAGEHeadquarters
Organically grow the holistic world view of disruptive innovation via empowerment.
OUR LOCATIONSWhere to find us
https://dlaignite.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/img-footer-map.png
GET IN TOUCHAvantage Social links
Taking seamless key performance indicators offline to maximise the long tail.
AVANTAGEHeadquarters
Organically grow the holistic world view of disruptive innovation via empowerment.
OUR LOCATIONSWhere to find us
https://dlaignite.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/img-footer-map.png
GET IN TOUCHAvantage Social links
Taking seamless key performance indicators offline to maximise the long tail.

Copyright by BoldThemes. All rights reserved.

Copyright by BoldThemes. All rights reserved.